KRAS protein

Biotechnology stakeholders from across the region will have the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge technologies addressing urgent and intractable problems in cancer research at the 2017 Technology Showcase, to be held at the Frederick National Laboratory’s (FNL) Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

Image of Extreme-Scale Computing

Two government agencies and five national laboratories are collaborating to develop extremely high-performance computing capabilities that will analyze mountains of research and clinical data to improve scientific understanding of cancer, predict drug response, and improve treatments for patients.

Portrait of Claudia Haywood

For speeding the delivery of an effective candidate vaccine during the largest Ebola outbreak in history, the Frederick National Lab (as Leidos Biomed) was cited along with National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline in winning an Excellence in Technology Transfer Award from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer.

Matthew Holderfield

FREDERICK, Md. -- An international collaboration has formed to begin an ambitious program of drug development and testing aimed at treating pancreatic cancers, lung cancers, and other malignancies driven by one of the most common and drug-resistant cancer genes.

Armed with new scientific understanding and the latest technologies, scientists at the Frederick National Lab and Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute in Glasgow, Scotland, will focus on one of the most intractable problems in cancer research — malignancies driven by mutations in RAS genes.

Formulated chikungunya vaccine.

An experimental vaccine for mosquito-borne chikungunya is being tested at sites in the Caribbean as part of a phase II clinical trial being managed by the Frederick National Lab.

Portrait of Eric Stahlberg

Eric Stahlberg, Ph.D., director of high-performance computing at the Frederick National Lab, has been named one of FCW‘s Federal 100 for his work in predictive oncology and his role in the collaboration between the National Cancer Institute and the Department of Energy (DOE) to expand the use of high-performance computing in cancer research.

Sergei Pletnev, Ph.D., is a Scientist II working for the Synchrotron Radiation Research Section of the Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory at the Argonne National Lab.

Scientists are making progress in understanding a bleeding disorder caused by prescription drug interactions, thanks to a high-tech research facility involving two federal national laboratories, Argonne and Frederick.

The facility—a high-energy particle accelerator—produces the clearest and most detailed images of the proteins involved in the disease, which causes bruising under the skin, nosebleeds, bleeding from the gums, and, in rare cases, brain hemorrhaging.

Raymond R. Cassell (r.), Administrator of C.H. Rennie Hospital greets Kate Kynvin, Program Manager, Frederick National Lab and PREVAIL.

When Project C.U.R.E.'s much-needed medical supplies and equipment arrive in Liberia, the Frederick National Lab’s Kathryn Kynvin is there to receive and distribute the donations to hospitals who continue to treat survivors of the most recent Ebola epidemic.

Project C.U.R.E., short for the Commission on Urgent Relief and Equipment, has committed to sending seven, 40-foot cargo containers to Liberia on behalf of the Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccines in Liberia (PREVAIL).

After years of testing, the FDA finally granted approval to test the therapy on humans.

An investigational brain cancer drug made with disabled polio virus and manufactured at the Frederick National Lab has won breakthrough status from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to fast-track its further refinement and clinical testing. 

Breakthrough status is designed to speed the development and approval of candidate therapies that treat serious or life-threatening diseases and show early evidence of outperforming existing treatments. 

A model of the interaction of processed KRAS-FME protein (cyan) with a lipid nanodisc (green and yellow).

A scientific innovation at the Frederick National Lab has opened the way for a new line of experiments in the decades-old quest for a drug to fight cancers triggered by mutant RAS proteins – which underlie one-third of all malignancies, including those of the pancreas, lung, and colon.

Using modified insect cells, a research group at the national lab recently invented a more accurate laboratory replica of a RAS protein, KRAS4b, that can be produced at high grade and in quantities adequate for research studies that were impossible previously.

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