3D print of the influenza virus. Credit: National Institutes of Health.

The upcoming flu season is just around the corner, and an ongoing challenge for researchers has been how to best respond to cases of severe influenza in the event of an outbreak.

The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research has helped the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to coordinate a clinical trial to determine if immune plasma could be an effective treatment for cases of severe influenza. The randomized controlled study is the first of its kind to rigorously assess this type of therapy.

Photo of laboratory work. National Cancer Institute image.

A new webpage will now make it easier for small businesses and others to find and apply for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research business opportunities.

The new solicitations page, which launched on the Frederick National Lab website August 31, is designed to bring increased visibility to business opportunities through a new, user-friendly platform that facilitates searching for open solicitations.

Cryo-Em illustration.

Cancer researchers nationwide now have access to the latest technology in the field of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM)—the study of protein structures at atomic resolution—at the Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research. The emerging technology comes at a time when the field of cryo-EM has the potential to revolutionize structural biology.

Members of the HPV Serology Laboratory. From left to right: Troy Kemp; Beth Schafer; Ligia Pinto; Casper Alabanza; and Christine Newkirk.

A new international initiative, led by scientists at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research and several other institutions, is being launched to provide expertise and leadership on the development, validation, and standardization of human papillomavirus (HPV) serology assays to be used in vaccine trials. HPV serology assays measure antibody responses following exposure to HPV or HPV vaccines.

Surface representation of the structure of oncogenic mutant of KRAS (colored violet) in complex with GTPase-activating proteins (colored light blue).

More than 100,000 newly diagnosed cases of cancer each year in the United States are subsequently linked to mutations in the KRAS protein. In response to this urgent problem, a new partnership agreement involving the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) could help identify significant therapeutic opportunities to target these types of cancers.

The 2017 Technology Showcase held at the Frederick National Lab’s Advanced Technology and Research Facility.

Before a crowded auditorium of science and business professionals at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research’s Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), Joost Oppenheim, M.D., had just finished his presentation about a compound that has the potential to expand the impact of a promising category of cancer therapeutics when he fielded a question from Stephan Stern, Ph.D. 

This image represents an infection-fighting cell called a neutrophil. In this artist’s rendering, the cell’s DNA is being “edited” to help restore its ability to fight bacterial invaders. Credit: NIAID, NIH

Gene editing using the powerful new CRISPR-Cas9 system is showing promise as a tool for developing potential treatments for inherited diseases, particularly for those caused by single genetic defects.

KRAS protein

Biotechnology stakeholders from across the region will have the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge technologies addressing urgent and intractable problems in cancer research at the 2017 Technology Showcase, to be held at the Frederick National Laboratory’s (FNL) Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

Image of Extreme-Scale Computing

Two government agencies and five national laboratories are collaborating to develop extremely high-performance computing capabilities that will analyze mountains of research and clinical data to improve scientific understanding of cancer, predict drug response, and improve treatments for patients.

Portrait of Claudia Haywood

For speeding the delivery of an effective candidate vaccine during the largest Ebola outbreak in history, the Frederick National Lab (as Leidos Biomed) was cited along with National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline in winning an Excellence in Technology Transfer Award from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer.

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