Cancer Genomic Clouds. National Cancer Institute photo.

SAN FRANCISCO – Computational drug design company Numerate has signed a letter of intent to join an open consortium of scientists staffed from two U.S. national laboratories, industry, and academia working to transform drug discovery and development into an approach that is rapid, integrated and with better patient outcomes.

The Frederick National Laboratory GDC project team. From left: Himanso Sahni; Sharon Gaheen; and Mark Jensen. Photo by Frank Blanchard.

FREDERICK, Md. -- A recent study that examined how mutations of a certain gene could affect clinical management of glioma, one of the most common types of primary brain tumors, is one of the first examples of the Genomic Data Commons’ impact on cancer research.

Sarah Skoczen, research associate, pharmacology and toxicology, Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory, prepares a mass spectrometer for sample analysis. 

FREDERICK, Md. -- Drug developers now have access to a shared analytical technology, developed and provided by the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, that helps fine-tune nanomedicine formulations and overcomes a key hurdle on the path toward Food and Drug Administration approval of effective new therapies and generic versions of nanomedicines. 

Scientist collaborate on research

FREDERICK, Md. -- A new collaboration established between Georgetown University and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research aims to expand both institutions’ research and training missions in the biomedical sciences.

Cell images show normal cells with two centrosomes, and cancer cells treated with CFI-400945, resulting in a multiplicy of centrosomes. Source: Masanori Kawakami in PNAS. 

FREDERICK, Md. -- A novel agent now being tested in human clinical trials of breast and other cancers may also prove to be a candidate for treating lung cancer, the No. 1 cancer killer worldwide.

The targeted treatment uses a new approach to destroy cancer cells. It attacks the basic machinery that malignant cells use to reproduce themselves. The machinery malfunctions and the cells die. Normal cells, however, are relatively unaffected, potentially eliminating many side effects.

A variety of antiretroviral drugs used to treat HIV infection. Credit: NIAID

A study published in the journal Science sheds new light on how a set of human genes can accelerate progression of AIDS-related illness in people living with HIV who are not on treatment.

South African scientists led the international research team, which included Frederick National Laboratory scientists, that involved 9,763 people with HIV in the United States and South Africa.

Transmission electron micrograph of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

FREDERICK, Md. -- A small clinical study overseen by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) with support from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research has found that an experimental treatment for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), an illness for which there is no licensed vaccine or treatment, is safe and well-tolerated in healthy volunteers. The study is also the first to demonstrate the safety of a treatment using antibodies manufactured from the plasma of cattle. 

Human cells with leukemia. Photo courtesy National Cancer Institute. 

The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research has entered into a new partnership with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center that if successful, could improve current methods of donor selection and thereby make lifesaving transplant procedures more readily available for patients with leukemia, multiple myeloma, and other disorders.

David Heimbrook and Ethan Dmitrovsky

RESTON, Va., Oct. 26, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Leidos (NYSE: LDOS), a FORTUNE 500® science and technology company, announced today that Ethan Dmitrovsky, M.D. was appointed President of subsidiary Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.

Frederick National Lab Data Center

Scientists from two U.S. national laboratories, industry, and academia today launched an unprecedented effort to transform the way cancer drugs are discovered by creating an open and sharable platform that integrates high-performance computing, shared biological data from public and industry sources, and emerging biotechnologies to dramatically accelerate the discovery of effective cancer therapies.

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