A variety of antiretroviral drugs used to treat HIV infection. Credit: NIAID

A study published in the journal Science sheds new light on how a set of human genes can accelerate progression of AIDS-related illness in people living with HIV who are not on treatment.

South African scientists led the international research team, which included Frederick National Laboratory scientists, that involved 9,763 people with HIV in the United States and South Africa.

Transmission electron micrograph of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

A small clinical study overseen by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) with support from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research has found that an experimental treatment for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), an illness for which there is no licensed vaccine or treatment, is safe and well-tolerated in healthy volunteers. The study is also the first to demonstrate the safety of a treatment using antibodies manufactured from the plasma of cattle. 

Human cells with leukemia. Photo courtesy National Cancer Institute. 

The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research has entered into a new partnership with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center that if successful, could improve current methods of donor selection and thereby make lifesaving transplant procedures more readily available for patients with leukemia, multiple myeloma, and other disorders.

Frederick National Lab Data Center

Scientists from two U.S. national laboratories, industry, and academia today launched an unprecedented effort to transform the way cancer drugs are discovered by creating an open and sharable platform that integrates high-performance computing, shared biological data from public and industry sources, and emerging biotechnologies to dramatically accelerate the discovery of effective cancer therapies.

David Heimbrook and Ethan Dmitrovsky

RESTON, Va., Oct. 26, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Leidos (NYSE: LDOS), a FORTUNE 500® science and technology company, announced today that Ethan Dmitrovsky, M.D. was appointed President of subsidiary Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.

3D print of the influenza virus. Credit: National Institutes of Health.

The upcoming flu season is just around the corner, and an ongoing challenge for researchers has been how to best respond to cases of severe influenza in the event of an outbreak.

The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research has helped the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to coordinate a clinical trial to determine if immune plasma could be an effective treatment for cases of severe influenza. The randomized controlled study is the first of its kind to rigorously assess this type of therapy.

Photo of laboratory work. National Cancer Institute image.

A new webpage will now make it easier for small businesses and others to find and apply for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research business opportunities.

The new solicitations page, which launched on the Frederick National Lab website August 31, is designed to bring increased visibility to business opportunities through a new, user-friendly platform that facilitates searching for open solicitations.

Cryo-Em illustration.

Cancer researchers nationwide now have access to the latest technology in the field of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM)—the study of protein structures at atomic resolution—at the Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research. The emerging technology comes at a time when the field of cryo-EM has the potential to revolutionize structural biology.

Members of the HPV Serology Laboratory. From left to right: Troy Kemp; Beth Schafer; Ligia Pinto; Casper Alabanza; and Christine Newkirk.

A new international initiative, led by scientists at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research and several other institutions, is being launched to provide expertise and leadership on the development, validation, and standardization of human papillomavirus (HPV) serology assays to be used in vaccine trials. HPV serology assays measure antibody responses following exposure to HPV or HPV vaccines.

Surface representation of the structure of oncogenic mutant of KRAS (colored violet) in complex with GTPase-activating proteins (colored light blue).

More than 100,000 newly diagnosed cases of cancer each year in the United States are subsequently linked to mutations in the KRAS protein. In response to this urgent problem, a new partnership agreement involving the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) could help identify significant therapeutic opportunities to target these types of cancers.

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