Human white blood cells with internalized particles (blue is cell nucleus, red is membrane, and green is RNA nanoparticles). Submitted by Marina Dobrovolskaia.

FREDERICK, Md. -- The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research is opening potential new avenues for coaxing the human immune system to fight cancer and other diseases through microscopic particles, or nanoparticles.

The use of nanoparticles to transport drugs to cancer cells is a growing field that has piqued scientists’ interest over the last two decades. Nanoparticles show potential because they can directly target and treat cancer cells. 

Instituto Nacional de Cancerologìa (National Cancer Institute of Mexico)

FREDERICK, Md. -- The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research will extend its scientific mentoring across international borders for the first time by offering postdoctoral research fellowships to scientists under an agreement with the National Cancer Institute of Mexico (INCan).

Under a three-year Memorandum of Understanding, the two institutions will cooperatively develop and launch a pilot program that will provide education and training in areas of mutual interest in cancer research.

2D image and 3D reconstruction of HIV-infected dendritic cell, imaged by FIB-SEM. Kedar Narayan, Ph.D.

FREDERICK, Md. -- Hundreds of science and business professionals are expected to attend the second annual Technology Showcase at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, scheduled for June 13. 

The event will feature technologies being developed at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Frederick National Laboratory to encourage startup company formation, technology licensing, and collaborations. 

Ethan Dmitrovsky and Andrea Chapdelaine sign the MOU agreement.

FREDERICK, Md. -- Hood College and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research have partnered to cohost an annual scientific symposium in the tradition of the landmark Oncogene Meeting, a national fixture in Frederick for more than 20 years.

A recently signed, three-year Memorandum of Understanding between the two institutions also will expand research and training opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students at the Frederick National Laboratory and provide professional development programs for Hood faculty and national laboratory staff.

This image shows pancreatic cancer cells (nuclei in blue) growing as a sphere encased in membranes (red).

FREDERICK, Md. -- In early experiments, a targeted nanomedicine has safely halted the growth of pancreatic cancer — the deadliest of solid tumors — and prevented its most dangerous feature, metastasis, the spread of tumor cells.

Cancer Genomic Clouds. National Cancer Institute photo.

SAN FRANCISCO – Computational drug design company Numerate has signed a letter of intent to join an open consortium of scientists staffed from two U.S. national laboratories, industry, and academia working to transform drug discovery and development into an approach that is rapid, integrated and with better patient outcomes.

The Frederick National Laboratory GDC project team. From left: Himanso Sahni; Sharon Gaheen; and Mark Jensen. Photo by Frank Blanchard.

FREDERICK, Md. -- A recent study that examined how mutations of a certain gene could affect clinical management of glioma, one of the most common types of primary brain tumors, is one of the first examples of the Genomic Data Commons’ impact on cancer research.

Sarah Skoczen, research associate, pharmacology and toxicology, Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory, prepares a mass spectrometer for sample analysis. 

FREDERICK, Md. -- Drug developers now have access to a shared analytical technology, developed and provided by the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, that helps fine-tune nanomedicine formulations and overcomes a key hurdle on the path toward Food and Drug Administration approval of effective new therapies and generic versions of nanomedicines. 

Scientist collaborate on research

FREDERICK, Md. -- A new collaboration established between Georgetown University and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research aims to expand both institutions’ research and training missions in the biomedical sciences.

Cell images show normal cells with two centrosomes, and cancer cells treated with CFI-400945, resulting in a multiplicy of centrosomes. Source: Masanori Kawakami in PNAS. 

FREDERICK, Md. -- A novel agent now being tested in human clinical trials of breast and other cancers may also prove to be a candidate for treating lung cancer, the No. 1 cancer killer worldwide.

The targeted treatment uses a new approach to destroy cancer cells. It attacks the basic machinery that malignant cells use to reproduce themselves. The machinery malfunctions and the cells die. Normal cells, however, are relatively unaffected, potentially eliminating many side effects.

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