Two government agencies and five national laboratories are collaborating to develop extremely high-performance computing capabilities that will analyze mountains of research and clinical data to improve scientific understanding of cancer, predict drug response, and improve treatments for patients.

For speeding the delivery of an effective candidate vaccine during the largest Ebola outbreak in history, the Frederick National Lab (as Leidos Biomed) was cited along with National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline in winning an Excellence in Technology Transfer Award from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer.

Scientists have discovered an efficient and straightforward model to manipulate RNA nanoparticles, a new concept that could help trigger desirable activation of the immune system with vaccines and therapies.

A multi-institutional team of researchers used an approach to fine tune DNA and RNA nanoparticles to activate multiple biological functions and pathways. The group recently published its findings in Nucleic Acids Research.

A landmark cancer drug trial is helping set the stage for moving precision medicine into the mainstream of clinical practice, according to a new study.

The study, reported in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, validates a procedure used in the drug trial that identifies the unique genetic mutations in a patient’s tumor, which is then used as the basis for selecting targeted drugs for treatment.

An experimental vaccine for mosquito-borne chikungunya is being tested at sites in the Caribbean as part of a phase II clinical trial being managed by the Frederick National Lab.

Eric Stahlberg, Ph.D., director of high-performance computing at the Frederick National Lab, has been named one of FCW‘s Federal 100 for his work in predictive oncology and his role in the collaboration between the National Cancer Institute and the Department of Energy (DOE) to expand the use of high-performance computing in cancer research.

Scientists are making progress in understanding a bleeding disorder caused by prescription drug interactions, thanks to a high-tech research facility involving two federal national laboratories, Argonne and Frederick.

The facility—a high-energy particle accelerator—produces the clearest and most detailed images of the proteins involved in the disease, which causes bruising under the skin, nosebleeds, bleeding from the gums, and, in rare cases, brain hemorrhaging.

When Project C.U.R.E.'s much-needed medical supplies and equipment arrive in Liberia, the Frederick National Lab’s Kathryn Kynvin is there to receive and distribute the donations to hospitals who continue to treat survivors of the most recent Ebola epidemic.

Project C.U.R.E., short for the Commission on Urgent Relief and Equipment, has committed to sending seven, 40-foot cargo containers to Liberia on behalf of the Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccines in Liberia (PREVAIL).

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