Four recent studies have given the scientific community a better understanding of how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) establishes and maintains itself in an infected individual and how antibody therapy may help prevent or fight the disease.

Biotechnology stakeholders from across the region will have the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge technologies addressing urgent and intractable problems in cancer research at the 2017 Technology Showcase, to be held at the Frederick National Laboratory’s (FNL) Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research is producing another round of Zika vaccine for ongoing studies to determine the best delivery method and dosage. This will lay the groundwork for additional tests to see if the vaccine prevents infection among volunteers in the United States and Central and South America.

Two government agencies and five national laboratories are collaborating to develop extremely high-performance computing capabilities that will analyze mountains of research and clinical data to improve scientific understanding of cancer, predict drug response, and improve treatments for patients.

For speeding the delivery of an effective candidate vaccine during the largest Ebola outbreak in history, the Frederick National Lab (as Leidos Biomed) was cited along with National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline in winning an Excellence in Technology Transfer Award from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer.

Scientists have discovered an efficient and straightforward model to manipulate RNA nanoparticles, a new concept that could help trigger desirable activation of the immune system with vaccines and therapies.

A multi-institutional team of researchers used an approach to fine tune DNA and RNA nanoparticles to activate multiple biological functions and pathways. The group recently published its findings in Nucleic Acids Research.

A landmark cancer drug trial is helping set the stage for moving precision medicine into the mainstream of clinical practice, according to a new study.

The study, reported in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, validates a procedure used in the drug trial that identifies the unique genetic mutations in a patient’s tumor, which is then used as the basis for selecting targeted drugs for treatment.

An experimental vaccine for mosquito-borne chikungunya is being tested at sites in the Caribbean as part of a phase II clinical trial being managed by the Frederick National Lab.

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