FREDERICK, Md. -- Hood College and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research have partnered to cohost an annual scientific symposium in the tradition of the landmark Oncogene Meeting, a national fixture in Frederick for more than 20 years.

A recently signed, three-year Memorandum of Understanding between the two institutions also will expand research and training opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students at the Frederick National Laboratory and provide professional development programs for Hood faculty and national laboratory staff.

FREDERICK, Md. -- In early experiments, a targeted nanomedicine has safely halted the growth of pancreatic cancer — the deadliest of solid tumors — and prevented its most dangerous feature, metastasis, the spread of tumor cells.

SAN FRANCISCO – Computational drug design company Numerate has signed a letter of intent to join an open consortium of scientists staffed from two U.S. national laboratories, industry, and academia working to transform drug discovery and development into an approach that is rapid, integrated and with better patient outcomes.

FREDERICK, Md. -- A recent study that examined how mutations of a certain gene could affect clinical management of glioma, one of the most common types of primary brain tumors, is one of the first examples of the Genomic Data Commons’ impact on cancer research.

FREDERICK, Md. -- Drug developers now have access to a shared analytical technology, developed and provided by the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, that helps fine-tune nanomedicine formulations and overcomes a key hurdle on the path toward Food and Drug Administration approval of effective new therapies and generic versions of nanomedicines. 

FREDERICK, Md. -- A new collaboration established between Georgetown University and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research aims to expand both institutions’ research and training missions in the biomedical sciences.

FREDERICK, Md. -- A novel agent now being tested in human clinical trials of breast and other cancers may also prove to be a candidate for treating lung cancer, the No. 1 cancer killer worldwide.

The targeted treatment uses a new approach to destroy cancer cells. It attacks the basic machinery that malignant cells use to reproduce themselves. The machinery malfunctions and the cells die. Normal cells, however, are relatively unaffected, potentially eliminating many side effects.

A study published in the journal Science sheds new light on how a set of human genes can accelerate progression of AIDS-related illness in people living with HIV who are not on treatment.

South African scientists led the international research team, which included Frederick National Laboratory scientists, that involved 9,763 people with HIV in the United States and South Africa.

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