Cancer researchers nationwide now have access to the latest technology in the field of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM)—the study of protein structures at atomic resolution—at the Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research. The emerging technology comes at a time when the field of cryo-EM has the potential to revolutionize structural biology.

A new international initiative, led by scientists at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research and several other institutions, is being launched to provide expertise and leadership on the development, validation, and standardization of human papillomavirus (HPV) serology assays to be used in vaccine trials. HPV serology assays measure antibody responses following exposure to HPV or HPV vaccines.

More than 100,000 newly diagnosed cases of cancer each year in the United States are subsequently linked to mutations in the KRAS protein. In response to this urgent problem, a new partnership agreement involving the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) could help identify significant therapeutic opportunities to target these types of cancers.

Before a crowded auditorium of science and business professionals at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research’s Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), Joost Oppenheim, M.D., had just finished his presentation about a compound that has the potential to expand the impact of a promising category of cancer therapeutics when he fielded a question from Stephan Stern, Ph.D. 

Gene editing using the powerful new CRISPR-Cas9 system is showing promise as a tool for developing potential treatments for inherited diseases, particularly for those caused by single genetic defects.

Four recent studies have given the scientific community a better understanding of how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) establishes and maintains itself in an infected individual and how antibody therapy may help prevent or fight the disease.

Biotechnology stakeholders from across the region will have the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge technologies addressing urgent and intractable problems in cancer research at the 2017 Technology Showcase, to be held at the Frederick National Laboratory’s (FNL) Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research is producing another round of Zika vaccine for ongoing studies to determine the best delivery method and dosage. This will lay the groundwork for additional tests to see if the vaccine prevents infection among volunteers in the United States and Central and South America.

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